1972 | Maserati Bora 4700

Maserati Bora 1972

EUR 215,000 JPY 27,765,100 BGN 420,497 CZK 5,234,605 DKK 1,600,266 GBP 179,811 HUF 77,010,850 PLN 974,337 RON 1,063,240 SEK 2,239,010 CHF 222,590 ISK 31,304,000 NOK 2,161,244 HRK 1,618,520 RUB 18,670,170 TRY 3,272,945 AUD 339,141 BRL 1,334,354 CAD 305,536 CNY 1,546,839 HKD 1,899,955 IDR 3,492,503,000 ILS 766,862 INR 18,150,085 KRW 290,656,350 MXN 4,992,924 MYR 1,021,422 NZD 363,006 PHP 12,506,765 SGD 328,090 THB 8,031,970 ZAR 3,688,239

 

Maserati Bora 4700

Maserati Bora 4700

Maserati Bora 4700

Maserati Bora 4700

Maserati Bora 4700

Maserati Bora 4700

Maserati Bora 4700

Maserati Bora 4700

Maserati Bora 4700

Maserati Bora 4700

Maserati Bora 4700

Maserati Bora 4700

Maserati Bora 4700

Maserati Bora 4700

Maserati Bora 4700
Maserati Bora 4700
Maserati Bora 4700
Maserati Bora 4700
Maserati Bora 4700
Maserati Bora 4700
Maserati Bora 4700
Maserati Bora 4700
Maserati Bora 4700
Maserati Bora 4700
Maserati Bora 4700
Maserati Bora 4700
Maserati Bora 4700
Maserati Bora 4700
1972 | Maserati Bora 4700

Maserati Bora 1972
EUR 215,000 JPY 27,765,100 BGN 420,497 CZK 5,234,605 DKK 1,600,266 GBP 179,811 HUF 77,010,850 PLN 974,337 RON 1,063,240 SEK 2,239,010 CHF 222,590 ISK 31,304,000 NOK 2,161,244 HRK 1,618,520 RUB 18,670,170 TRY 3,272,945 AUD 339,141 BRL 1,334,354 CAD 305,536 CNY 1,546,839 HKD 1,899,955 IDR 3,492,503,000 ILS 766,862 INR 18,150,085 KRW 290,656,350 MXN 4,992,924 MYR 1,021,422 NZD 363,006 PHP 12,506,765 SGD 328,090 THB 8,031,970 ZAR 3,688,239

 

Spain

 
Coupe
228/310 kw/hp
71,444 km
Enrique Garcia

LUXMARE EUROPE S.L.

  • Vehicle details

    Vehicle data
    Make Maserati
    Model Bora
    Model name Bora 4700
    Year of manufacture 1972
    Condition category Original
    Mileage 71,444 km
    Previous owners 2
    First registration 01/1972
    Matching numbers Yes
    Technical details
    Body style Coupe
    Body detail Coupe
    Power (kw/hp) 228/310
    Cubic capacity (ccm) 4,719
    Cylinders 8
    Doors 2
    Steering Left (LHD)
    Transmission Manual
    Gears 5
    Drive Rear
    Front Brake Disc
    Rear Brake Disc
    Fuel Petrol
    Individual configuration
    Exterior colour Red
    Manufacturer colour name Red
    Interior colour Black
    Interior material Leather
    Electric windows

Description

Shortly after Citroën acquired a majority stake in Maserati in 1968, the concept of a mid-engined two-seat sports car was proposed. Lamborghini and De Tomaso already had the Miura and Mangusta, while Ferrari was known to be developing its own mid-engined contender. Initially known as Type 117 and later as Bora, the Maserati project was launched in October 1968 and a prototype was on the road in mid-1969. Shown in its final form at the Geneva Motor Show in March 1971, the deliveries started before the end of the year. Maserati ran into problems after being purchased by De Tomaso in 1975, and the Bora was discontinued after the 1978 model year. 564 Boras were produced in total, of which 275 were fitted with 4.9L engines and the other 289 were fitted with 4.7L engines.
The Bora was designed by Giorgetto Giugiaro at Italdesign and has a drag coefficient of 0.30. The manufacture of the all-steel panels was contracted to Officine Padane de Modena. The Bora had a number of innovative features that set the car apart from previous Maserati offerings. Compared to other supercars, it was civilized and practical, with a group of hydraulically operated pedals that could be moved back and forth at the touch of a button and a steering wheel that could be tilted and telescoped, addressing the familiar problem of getting in and out. vehicle. typical vehicle of many supercars.

Most supercars offer little footroom and little to no provision for luggage, but the Bora has a full-size trunk at the front of the vehicle and was otherwise known to be far more civilized in amenities than your competitors. Unlike its competitors, the Bora used double pane glass that separated its cabin from the engine compartment, as well as a carpeted aluminum engine cover, which greatly decreased engine noise in the cabin and increased the level of engine noise. comfort for the driver. The ZF five-speed engine and transaxle were mounted on a subframe attached to the monocoque via four flexible mounts, which also helped ride quality.

Two V8 engines were offered initially, a high-revving 4.719 cc (4.7 L; 288.0 cu in) and a higher torque 4,930 cc (4.9 L; 300.8 cu in); A US smog-rated 4.9-liter engine (a race version of the 4.7) was used, beginning in the 1973 model year. Eventually, production switched to using only a more powerful version of the 4.9-liter engine with 320 hp (324 PS; 239 kW) at 5,500 rpm and 454 N⋅m (335 lb⋅ft) of torque at 4,000 rpm. All of these engines traced their lineage back to the famous 450S race car, were made of aluminum alloy and had hemispherical combustion chambers with 16 valves in total operated by four cams (chain actuated). Both engines were mounted longitudinally in the middle of the car and were mated to a ZF-1 five-speed transaxle that sent power to the rear wheels. They were powered by four Weber 42 DCNF / 14 downdraft carburettors with Bosch electronic ignition. The compression ratio is 8.5: 1.
A combined steel monocoque body and chassis featured a tubular steel subframe at the rear for the engine and transmission. It also featured independent suspension throughout (a first for a Maserati road car) with coil springs, telescopic suspension shocks, and anti-roll bars. [6] The development prototype and broadly similar show car first seen at the 1971 Geneva Motor Show featured a MacPherson strut-based front suspension, but this was dropped for production because, installed in combination With very wide front tires and rack and pinion steering, the strut The water-based solution produced strong kickback. For production cars, Maserati reverted to a more conservative fork front suspension arrangement.

Citroën's advanced high-pressure LHM hydraulic system was adopted to operate the ventilated disc brakes in the main circuit and, in an auxiliary circuit, the pedal box (clutch, brake, foot throttle), the driver's seat (only vertical adjustments) and the retractable system. headlights. [5] Wheels were 7.5 x 15 inches (190.5 mm x 381.0 mm) Campagnolo light alloy type with distinctive removable polished stainless steel hubcaps on previous models. The tires were Michelin XWX 205x70 front and rear, however, these early cars had problems with "tramlining" at high speed. To solve this problem, Maserati installed in automobiles with 215 / 70VR15 tires at the rear, with a choice of Michelin XWX or Pirelli Cinturato CN12 tires.

The most distinctive details of the Bora were the brushed stainless steel roof and the windshield pillars. Inside, the bucket seats, dash, door trims, center console and rear bulkhead were trimmed in leather, with power windows and air conditioning as standard. The steering column was manually adjusted for tilt and reach, while the LHM aux. Circuit controls adjusted the driver's seat vertically, the pedal box (consisting of the brake, clutch and accelerator pedals) can be adjusted horizontally forward and backward by about 76 mm (3.0 in), a first instead of this guy.

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Maserati Bora 4700
Maserati Bora 4700
Maserati Bora 4700
Maserati Bora 4700
Maserati Bora 4700
Maserati Bora 4700
Maserati Bora 4700
Maserati Bora 4700
Maserati Bora 4700
Maserati Bora 4700
Maserati Bora 4700
Maserati Bora 4700
Maserati Bora 4700
Maserati Bora 4700
  • Condition & Registration

    Engine (Seller assessment): 5 of 5
    Technique (Seller assessment): 5 of 5
    Paint (Seller assessment): 5 of 5
    Interior (Seller assessment): 5 of 5
    Pink Slip
    Historic license plate
    Registered
    Ready to drive
    Accident-free
    Vehicle-ID: 260756

Dealer-Imprint

LUXMARE EUROPE S.L.

C/Caracas 43-45 Nave 3

08030 Barcelona

+34 933 11 26 68

Enrique Garcia

Seller

Enrique Garcia
LUXMARE EUROPE S.L.
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