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Image 14/19 of Invicta 4.5 Litre A-Type High Chassis (1930)
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1930 | Invicta 4.5 Litre A-Type High Chassis

1930 Invicta 4.5 Litre High Chassis Tourer

€128,764
🇬🇧Dealer

Description

The Invicta motor car was one of the important sporting high performance cars of the 1920s and 1930s. The company was founded by Noel Macklin in 1924 and produced several models until the mid-1930’s, from the early examples with a 2 ½ litre engine right through to the superb 4 ½ litre Meadows-engined variants.

Macklin wanted to build a petrol-engined car with the characteristics of a steam car. Smooth running, dependable and with loads of torque. Macklin was backed financially by Oliver Lyle, a British sugar technologist of the famous Tate & Lyle company. Oliver Lyle and his brother Philip did not like gear changing, and wanted a car that was powerful and flexible enough, to ‘render excessive gear changing unnecessary.' Macklin's Invictas were designed with flexible, high torque engines that would enable top gear to be selected at exceptionally low speeds.

The cars were strongly supported by competitive drivers and a 3 litre Invicta took the Long Distance Record at Monza and also the 5,000 mile record at Montlhery achieving an average speed of 70.7 mph, winning Invicta a Dewar Trophy. Violette Cordery, a motoring legend of the pre-war era was sister-in-law to company founder Noel Macklin and she drove a 3-litre Invicta around the world in 1927 - taking less than 5 months! She was accompanied by an RAC observer, a mechanic, and a nurse. 10, 266 miles were covered, travelling through Europe, Australia, Africa, India, Canada and across the USA. Invicta's reputation for reliability was firmly established and in 1928 the Meadows engine was increased in capacity to 4 ½ litres with over 100BHP. The chassis frames and axles were then made stronger to cope with the increased power and in 1929 Miss Cordery used one of these new cars at Brooklands, averaging 61.57 mph or over for 30,000 miles.

The Wall Street Crash of 1929 severely affected the luxury car market and in 1930 a number of changes were made to the Invicta 4.5 litre model in order to reduce production costs. The car we offer here is one of these cars, designated the A series and features the thoroughbred straight-six engine designed and built by the legendary Wolverhampton-based Henry Meadows company. The six-cylinder Meadows is immensely strong and exceptionally smooth, delivering an abundance of power across a wide rev range. It was a modified 4.5 litre Meadows engine which achieved a controversial Le Mans victory in 1935. That car, a Lagonda M45R won Le Mans despite having hardly any oil left in its engine and with damaged steering following a a collision with a spinning Aston Martin during a torrential downpour.

Little is known about the early history of this superb VSCC eligible Invicta 4.5 Litre High Chassi Tourer, though we do have an old photograph of what appears to be a barn find. We are told by the last owner that the car was fully restored from a rolling chassis over twenty-two years and was with the previous owner since 1989. It is a very well presented car which has recently benefitted from a new set of wheels and tyres and some cabinetry work on the walnut dash. On the road, the attraction of the model is immediately apparent. Lusty, smooth, and powerful, the Meadows 4.5 litre engine propels the car like no other we've driven from this era. It is right up there with the WO Bentleys and Lagondas in terms of build quality and ‘presence.' On the road it feels much quicker than for example a 3 litre Bentley. It is quite simply, exhilarating to drive. This Invicta is VSCC eligible and has apparently been hill climbed just once. It represents tremendous value for money and seems the prefect car for vintage trials and hill climbs. It is a car that must be driven to appreciate why Invicta has become such a legendary marque amongst the great British thoroughbred cars of that era.

Vehicle details

Vehicle data

Make
Invicta
Model series
4.5 Litre A-Type
Model name
4.5 Litre A-Type High Chassis
First registration date
Not provided
Year of manufacture
1930
Mileage (read)
1 mls
Chassis number
Not provided
Engine number
Not provided
Gearbox number
Not provided
Matching numbers
No
Previous owners
Not provided

Technical details

Body style
Convertible (Tourer)
Power (kW/hp)
66/90
Cubic capacity (ccm)
4467
Cylinders
6
Doors
Not provided
Steering
Not specified
Gearbox
Manual
Gears
Not provided
Transmission
Rear
Front brakes
Not provided
Rear brakes
Not provided
Fuel type
Petrol

Individual configuration

Exterior color
Others
Manufacturer color name
-
Interior color
Others
Interior material
Others

Condition, registration & documentation

Has Report
Registered
Ready to drive

Location

Logo of Classic & Sportscar Centre

Classic & Sportscar Centre

Andrew Welham

Corner Farm, West Knapton  

YO17 8JB Malton

🇬🇧 United Kingdom

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