Monarch Classic Cars for Sale

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Monarch

The Monarch automobile was manufactured by the Monarch Motor Car Company in Detroit, Michigan from 1913 to 1917 that sold low-price vehicles.

The birth of Monarch

The Monarch Motor Car Company was founded by Joseph Bloom early in 1913. Monarch automobiles were designed by Bloom's brother-in-law Robert C Hupp, of 1909 'Hupmobile' fame. Hupp had left his Hupp Motor Car Company over disagreements with investors regarding payment of dividends (he believed these should be reinvested into the company). By summer 1913, Monarch had moved into the former Carhartt Motor Car Company factory that had closed the previous year.

Monarch automobiles

The very first Monarch model designed by Hupp was a small 4-cylinder automobile priced at $925, and by the end of 1913, 150 Monarch automobiles had been manufactured. This model was marketed as a leader in its field (as befitting the Monarch name) and provided great value for the low price tag, comprising many features only seen in high-end vehicles. According to an advertisement from December 1913, the Monarch offered 'exceptional roominess' (so much leg room a foot rail was required), good fuel economy, engine reliability and was convenient to drive ('hand brake within easy reach'). As well as these practicalities, this model also had 'lines of grace and beauty' with its streamlined body and Renault hood.

Later in 1914 a smaller 4-cylinder Monarch was launched, priced at $675 and marketed with the slogan "The Car with the Silver Wheels". Hupp was keen to expand the Monarch range into larger vehicles. He designed a large open five passenger model with a with a 4.6L V8 engine priced at $1500 and weighing an impressive 1400kg. Sadly, Monarch automobiles never reached the dizzy heights of fame achieved by the Hupmobile.

The death of Monarch

Although various Detroit backers had offered to inject cash into this latest venture into larger cars, financial backing never materialised. Production of these vehicles could not be sustained; early in 1916 the Monarch Motor Car Company were declared bankrupt. By the end of the year the rights to Monarch had been sold to the Carter Brothers of Hyattsville, Maryland. The next Monarch automobile to be manufactured was a 12-cyclinder model (still designed by Hupp), however, when they went on sale in 1917 they were known as CBs rather than by the Monarch name.